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Elsevier announced the winners of the 2010 Semantic Web Challenge. The Elsevier sponsored Challenge occurred at the International Semantic Web Conference held in Shanghai, China from 7-11 November, 2010. A jury consisting of seven leading experts from both academia and industry awarded the four best applications with cash prizes exceeding 3000 Euro in total.

Over the last eight years, the Challenge has attracted more than 140 entries. All submissions are evaluated rigorously by a jury composed of leading scientists and experts from industry in a 3 round knockout competition consisting of a poster session, oral presentations and live demonstrations.

Organized this year by Christian Bizer from the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, and Diana Maynard from the University of Sheffield, UK, the Semantic Web Challenge consists of two categories: “Open Track” and “Billion Triples Track.”

The Open Track requires that the applications can be used by ordinary people or scientists and must make use of the meaning of information on the web. The Billion Triples track requires applications to scale up to deal with huge amounts of information which has been gathered from the open web.

The winners of the 2010 Open Track challenge were the team from Stanford University comprising of Clement Jonquet, Paea LePendu, Sean M. Falconer, Adrien Coulet, Natalya F. Noy, Mark A. Musen, and Nigam H. Shah for “NCBO Resource Index: Ontology-Based Search and Mining of Biomedical Resources”. Their entry provides very clear benefits to the biomedical community, bringing together knowledge from many different entities on the web with a large corpus of scientific literature though the clever application of semantic web technologies and principles.

The second prize in the open track was awarded to the team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute comprising of Dominic DiFranzo, Li Ding, John S. Erickson, Xian Li, Tim Lebo, James Michaelis, Alvaro Graves, Gregory Todd Williams, Jin Guang Zheng, Johanna Flores, Zhenning Shangguan, Gino Gervasio, Deborah L. McGuinness and Jim Hendler, for the development of “TWC LOGD: A Portal for Linking Open Government Data” – a massive semantic effort in opening up and linking all the public US government data, and providing the ecosystem and education for re-use.

The third prize in the 2010 Open Track was won by a combined team from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Oxford University and the University of Southern California comprising of Denny Vrandecic, Varun Ratnakar, Markus Krötzsch, and Yolanda Gil for their entry “Shortipedia” – a Web-based knowledge repository and collaborative curating system, pulling together a growing number of sources in order to provide a comprehensive, multilingual and diversived view on entities of interest – a Wikipedia on steroids.

The Billion Triples Track was won by “Creating voiD Descriptions for Web-scale Data” by Christoph Böhm, Johannes Lorey, Dandy Fenz, Eyk Kny, Matthias Pohl, Felix Naumann from Potsdam Univesity, Germany. This entry uses state of the art parallelisation techniques, and some serious cloud computing power, to dissect the enormous Billion Triples dataset into topic-specific views.

Further Information

Further information about the Semantic Web Challenge 2010, the runners-up, all submissions and the evaluation committee is found on the Former Challenges page as well as in the Elsevier Press release about the Semantic Web Challenge 2010.

 

Elsevier announced the winners of the 2009 Semantic Web Challenge, which took place at the International Semantic Web Conference held in Washington, D.C., from October 25-29, 2009. A jury consisting of eleven leading experts from both academia and industry awarded the four best applications with cash prizes of 2750 Euro in total, sponsored by Elsevier.

The 2009 Semantic Web Challenge was organized by Peter Mika of Yahoo! Research and Chris Bizer of Freie Universität Berlin and consists of two categories: “Open Track” and “Billion Triples Track.” Open Track requires that the applications utilize the semantics (meaning) of data and that they have been designed to operate in an open web environment, whilst the Billion Triples Track focuses on dealing with very large data sets of low quality commonly found on the web.

The Billion Triples Track was won by “Scalable Reduction” by Gregory Todd Williams, Jesse Weaver, Medha Atre, and James A. Hendler (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA). The entry showed how massive parallelization can be applied to quickly clean and filter large amounts of RDF data.

The winners of the 2009 Open Track were Chintan Patel, Sharib Khan, and Karthik Gomadam from Applied Informatics, Inc for “TrialX” (http://trialx.com). TrialX enables finding new treatments by intelligently matching patients to clinical trials using advanced medical onthologies to combine several electronic health records with user generated information.

The second prize of the 2009 Open Track was awarded to Andreas Harth from the Institute of Applied Informatics and Formal Description Methods, Universität Karlsruhe, Germany for “VisiNav” (http://visinav.deri.org/). The third prize in the 2009 open Track was awarded to Giovanni Tummarello, Richard Cyganiak, Michele Catasta, Szymon Danielczyk, and Stefan Decker from the Digital Enterprise Research Institute, Ireland for the development of “Sig.ma” (http://sig.ma/).

“This year’s winner of the Open Track is an application that we can hold up as an example to those outside of our community. In comparison, the Billion Triples Track have attracted less submissions this year, but it has been noticeable that all submissions have dealt with increasing amounts of information. Altogether we see clear progress toward implementing the vision of the Semantic Web.” said Chris Bizer and Peter Mika, co-chairs of the Semantic Web Challenge.

Open Track
1st place:
TrialX
Chintan Patel, Sharib Khan, and Karthik Gomadam from Applied Informatics, Inc
http://www.cs.vu.nl/~pmika/swc/documents/TrialX-healthx-iswc09-challenge.pdf

2nd place:
VisiNav
Andreas Harth from the Institute of Applied Informatics and Formal Description Methods, Universität Karlsruhe, Germany
http://www.cs.vu.nl/~pmika/swc/documents/VisiNav-paper.pdf

3rd place:
Sig.ma
Giovanni Tummarello, Richard Cyganiak, Michele Catasta, Szymon Danielczyk, and Stefan Decker from the Digital Enterprise Research Institute, Ireland
http://www.cs.vu.nl/~pmika/swc/documents/Sig.ma:%20Live%20views%20on%20the%20web%20of%20data-sigma.pdf

Billion Triples Track:
Winner:
Scalable Reduction
Gregory Todd Williams, Jesse Weaver, Medha Atre, and James A. Hendler from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
http://www.cs.vu.nl/~pmika/swc/documents/Scalable%20Reduction%20of%20Large%20Datasets%20to%20Interesting%20Subsets-btc2009.pdf

More information on the 2009 Semantic Web Challenge Awards, as well as a demo and links to all the competing applications can be found on http://challenge.semanticweb.org

The Semantic Web Challenge offers participants the chance to show the best of the Semantic Web. The Challenge thus serves several purposes:

  • Helps us illustrate to society what the Semantic Web can provide
  • Gives researchers an opportunity to showcase their work and compare it to others
  • Stimulates current research to a higher final goal by showing the state-of-the-art every year

 

What is the goal?

The overall objective of the challenge is to apply Semantic Web techniques in building online end-user applications that integrate, combine and deduce information needed to assist users in performing tasks.

The Semantic Web Challenge Advisory board also defines an additional goal every year based on the development of the Challenge. Find out more about the upcoming Challenge.

 

Semantic Web Challenge 2008

Here is the list of accepted submissions for “Semantic Web Challenge 2008” which will be presented at ISWC 2008. You will find more information about these projects at challenge.semanticweb.org.